Sunday, September 09, 2018

The largest spiritual gathering of women in the world

Once a year, millions of women from all over India travel to Thiruvananthapuram to participate in what is considered the largest spiritual gathering of women in the world. The event centers around the offering of Pongala to goddess Bhadrakali, the fierce form of the Devi.

Worship during Attukal Pongala at Tippu Street, South Fort, Thiruvananthapuram
Worship during Attukal Pongala at Tippu Street, South Fort, Thiruvananthapuram

Sources:

Gingrich, J. (2018, September 05). The Festival Where Millions of Women Prepare a Feast for a Goddess. Retrieved September 9, 2018, from https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/indian-festival-all-women

Srinivas, R. (2007, April 08). Worship during Attukal Pongala at Tippu Street, South Fort, Thiruvananthapuram [Digital image]. Retrieved September 9, 2018, from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pongale1.jpg CC-BY-SA-3.0

Saturday, September 01, 2018

Vedas and Upanishads

Here is a short video that I made that aligns the principal Upanishads with the Vedas.


Note that the alphabetization of English and Devanagari are different.

Friday, August 10, 2018

OCR tool for Sanskrit

Hi all,

This update from the Sanskrit at SOAS Facebook group showed up in my Facebook feed:


Sources:

SanskritCR. (n.d.). Retrieved August 10, 2018, from http://ocr.sanskritdictionary.com/ 

Wojtczak, L. (2018, August 10).  A new OCR tool for devanagari! Retrieved August 10, 2018, from https://www.facebook.com/groups/705791296265189/permalink/1069377789906536/

Sunday, June 03, 2018

Buddhism: A Diagram

Have you ever gotten confused about the 3 jewels, 4 noble truths, the 8-fold path, and other enumerations in Buddhism?  Sabio Lantz has created this diagram that illustrates the relationships among these elements of Buddhism:

Buddhism Diagram

Sabio Lantz writes:
I created this diagram to assist my future posts on Buddhist themes.  Below are links and texts to help explain the outline.  It is my hope that this diagram aids the reader in visually organizing the dharma (the Buddha’s teachings) in a way that makes it easier to remember, question and discuss.
Sources:

Lantz, Sabio. “Buddhism: a Diagram.” Triangulations, 10 Aug. 2010, triangulations.wordpress.com/2010/08/10/buddhism-a-diagram/.

Lantz, Sabio. [Buddhism]. Triangulations, 10 Aug. 2010, triangulations.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/buddhism101b.jpg

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Hindu Murthis & Vigrahams Smuggled Out of India

Ugra has assembled a collection of images of Hindu Murthis and Vigrahams Smuggled Out of India on Twitter.

Here is a statue of the child saint Sambandar that dates back to the Chola period:

Child Saint Sambandar

It is currently housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.  According to the web page, here is the provenance of this statue:
Dr. J. R. Belmont , Basel (by ca. 1950, until 1966; sold to Ellsworth); Robert H. Ellsworth , New York (1966–2008; sold to Wiener); [ Doris Wiener , New York, 2008–10; gift and sale to MMA]
Therefore, we have no idea of its provenance prior to 1950 CE.

Sources:

[Child Saint Sambandar]. (n.d.). Retrieved May 27, 2018, from https://images.metmuseum.org/CRDImages/as/original/DP234672.jpg

A Compilation of Hindu Murthis & Vigrahams Smuggled Out of India. (n.d.). Retrieved May 27, 2018, from https://twitter.com/i/moments/999916482640232450

A compilation of priceless Hindu murthis which lay smuggled away in various museums across the globe. The murthis include some of the rarest & finest pieces which are not seen even in India. This thread is intended to raise awareness about it.

Child Saint Sambandar. (n.d.). Retrieved May 27, 2018, from https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/75960

Sambandar, the popular seventh-century child saint, is one of the muvar, the three principal saints of South India. Legend recounts that after receiving a gift of milk (represented by the bowl) from the goddess Uma, the infant Sambandar devoted his life to composing hymns in praise of Lord Shiva; his raised hand points to Shiva’s heavenly abode at Mount Kailash, in the Himalayas. The sculptor captured the saint’s childlike quality while also empowering him with the maturity and authority of a spiritual leader. This icon was intended for processional use during temple festivals celebrating gods and saints.

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